This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
This is default featured slide 4 title
This is default featured slide 5 title
 

5 Ways to Turn Your Customer Complaints Into Business Ideas

Do you cringe when a customer complains? If so, it’s time to start thinking of those complaints as possible opportunities instead of problems – opportunities that could lead to new product lines, services or a new venture.  But how do you actually identify new business ideas hiding in your customer complaints?  Here are five tips to get you started.

Be open to closing the gaps

To get useful inspirational tips and leads from your customers, they must know that you’re open to hearing about the gaps in your product lines or services.

“Ask your customers what you could do better,” said Kevin Barnicle, founder and CEO of IT consulting and software firm Controle. “This seems like simple advice but it is very powerful.” Barnicle said that asking one of his customers this simple question uncovered a potentially profitable need that wasn’t being fully met.

While the customer acknowledged that the product Barnicle sold him did what it was supposed to do, the client needed more than the product provided.  As a result, there was a gap in communications between two critical teams in the client’s company – the IT team and the legal team. “If you could offer a service to help me bridge that gap I would buy it,” Barnicle recalled his client saying.

When Barnicle left his old company and started Controle, he offered exactly the service the client had pointed out was missing, and even named it for the complaint. “Our Bridge the Gap service is one of our most profitable and popular services we provide,”  Barnicle said. “It was all created from a customer complaint.” [Looking for a business idea? Visit our business idea section]

‘Simplify’ may signal business opportunity

Is there a demand for a simpler or faster version of your product or service hiding in your customer complaints?  This was the case for the folks at 99designs.com, an online graphics design contest platform.

“Our new products are a direct reflection of the feedback we receive from our customers and designer community,” said Shayne Tilley, general manager of Swiftly. “A great example of this is our newest offering, Swiftly, a service for quick design jobs.”

Tilley said that although customers are happy with the services they receive through 99designs, they often had other smaller or simpler jobs that didn’t fit the service offerings of 99designs. “After our customers had their logo, website, banner ad, business card, etc., created on 99designs, they would ask us, “How do I get this updated or integrated with other existing marketing collateral like brochures, social media creative, et cetera?” Tilley said.

And the 99designs team had the same problem with their own simple jobs – it didn’t make sense to ask the company Web designers to stop working on important projects to complete something like a simple business card update, Tilley said. “Given that our customers were experiencing the same problems as us, we decided to do something about it and thus Swiftly was born,” Tilley said. Swiftly lets customers post small design jobs and have them completed within one hour. “Our average turnaround time is actually 30 minutes,” Tilley said.

Pay special attention to the loudmouths

Do you have a handful of customers that complain frequently? Instead of labeling them troublemakers, start thinking of them as your idea-generators.

“Realize that a customer that complains is sometimes the best customer,” Barnicle said.  Though no one likes to deal with some who’s constantly whining about something, Barnicle said the customers that complain the most usually are the most passionate. “If you can solve their complaint or problem, you will most likely have a customer for life,” he said.

Look to your own complaints

Are you a customer? Take a look at your very own complaints – there could be a new business hiding in your pet peeves. And chances are, if something isn’t working for you, there are others out there with the same problem.

“In 2009, when I was moving, the shipping company broke my TV,” said Girish Mathrubootham, founder and CEO of online customer support and help-desk company Freshdesk.  “I sent multiple emails to the shipping company, but they just asked me to jump through hoops and made no signs of intending to settle my claim.”

Mathrubootham was so frustrated, he finally wrote about his experience in an online forum. Within a day, the shipping company paid him what they owed.

“This experience taught me that customers have social power, and it inspired us to build a customer support solution that leverages social media,” Mathrubootham said. Freshdesk now has 23,000 customers using their customer-support solution worldwide.

Will your customers pay for a solution?

While there may be multiple new business possibilities in your customer’s complaints, how can you find those that will lead to profitable new business?  Evaluate each complaint carefully. If the issue shouldn’t have occurred, or been solved by the service or product they’ve already purchased, simply fix the problem. If not, it could mean there’s a potential new business idea right under your nose – and to find out, ask.

“Simply ask customers,” Barnicle said. “Be up front, and just ask them, ‘If I could solve your problem would you pay for it?’ Doing so you will immediately find out how much of a complaint it really is,” Barnicle said.

When one of Controle’s clients constantly complained about inefficiencies dealing with a software manufacturer’s customer support, Barnicle did exactly this. “We simply asked them, ‘If we offered a service to take that completely off your area of responsibility, would you purchase it?'” The result?  A new service, and a new long-term contract.

7 Business Ideas for Food Lovers

Bakery

If you frequently find yourself whipping up a batch of cookies to stave off boredom, why not get paid for it by opening a bakery? Pull out grandma’s old recipes (or create your own) and find desserts that you can replicate perfectly every time. Of course, retail space and equipment can cost a small fortune, so if you want to launch your bakery sooner rather than later, accept orders online and deliver or ship to local areas. This is a great business to run in your spare time, as you can fill orders during evenings and weekends.

Catering

Have you ever hosted a dinner party or holiday meal and found yourself barely able to enjoy it because of all the preparation? If you’re a skilled home cook that can create delicious meals for a large group of people, you can help alleviate the stress of planning and preparing food for parties as a caterer. While bigger events like weddings and Sweet 16s might be hard to handle without a team, you could likely handle smaller home gatherings by yourself or with a business partner. Make sure you have enough kitchen space to prepare the meals and the means to transport the food to your clients.

Grocery delivery

On-the-go working parents barely have time to cook dinner, let alone shop for groceries. If you have a spacious vehicle and some spare time during evenings and weekends, you can help these busy families by making supermarket runs for them. Clients can send you their grocery lists and pay for the items you pick up. Then you can make a profit by charging for time and delivery. Make an effort to compare prices for the best deals, and shop wholesale for common items to save them money.

Specialty food maker

With an increasing number of Americans living with food allergies and dietary restrictions, the market for vegan and gluten-free specialty items has grown exponentially. In fact, a May 2013 report by Markets and Markets predicts a compound annual growth rate of 10.2 percent for gluten-free products alone. With a little research, you could learn to make these specialty snacks and baked goods to package and sell.

Farmers market vendor

If you’re an avid home gardener and want to make a profit from your produce, sign up to be a vendor at a farmers market. The organic movement is still going strong, so having naturally grown fruits and vegetables will give you an advantage over competing growers that use conventional methods. You may have to go through an application process and/or get certified by your local board of health to begin selling.

estaurant franchise owner

Investing in a franchise is a great way to become a business owner without having to come up with a concept or marketing strategy. With restaurant franchises, the product, brand and audience are already in place. All you need is a good location and some startup money, which is relatively easy to come by: Because a franchise has a proven business model, you’re more likely to get a loan for this low-risk investment.

Nutrition coach

There’s no question that obesity is a growing problem in America, and many people who want to lose weight and eat better simply don’t know where to start. You don’t necessarily need to be a registered dietitian to offer meal plans and diet counseling. Read some nutrition books or take an online course, and use that knowledge to recommend delicious and healthy recipes to your clients that they can easily prepare at home.

5 Smart Ways to Come Up With a Good Business Ideas

Are you thrilled by the idea of starting your own business? You know you have the energy, enthusiasm and commitment of an entrepreneur, but you’re missing one critical element to success: a good business idea. Don’t get frustrated — inspiration is all around you. Here are five tips on where to find good business ideas.

Problems and pet peeves

Good business ideas often solve a problem. Begin your search by listing the problems in your own life.

“Look for problems that no one has addressed yet,” said Boris Wertz, founder of Version One Ventures. “These could be problems that you are having yourself, such as ‘I wish this kind of product or service existed,'” Wertz said. Alternatively, look for problems that other people and/or companies are having.

“This approach tends to work best when you have experience with a certain company or industry, and can understand what their needs are,” Wertz said. “You can build a better idea off of this experience.”

[Looking for a business idea? Visit our business idea page]

A side project or hobby

Sometimes awesome ideas grow from a pet side project or hobby. If you’re having trouble finding your next business idea, start a side project.

“Simply sitting down and trying to brainstorm ideas for a new business doesn’t normally work well for most,” Wertz said.

“Instead, choose an area that interests you for your side project, and look for problems and issues that arise while you are working,” he said.  Wertz said to always keep your eyes open for problems that need solutions, and then to find ways to solve the problems you identify. “Spend time figuring out viable solutions to the issues and problems you have found during work on your side project,” he said. “This is where you’ll find the foundation for a great business idea, the solution to an identified problem.”

Your business network

Remember the phrase “two heads are better than one?” Some of the best business ideas appear when you work with others, instead of on your own.

“I’ve seen great people waste years on terrible business ideas, and if there were one characteristic that separates them from the great ideas it’s this: No ideas in isolation!” said international business coach Jacob Aldridge.

If you don’t know where to find people who may help you come up with a great business idea, Aldridge says to begin by getting in touch with everyone you already know in the business world.

“Ask them all, even your accountant, for an introduction to the most interesting business person they know,” he said.

Another source that may inspire new business ideas is LinkedIn. In addition to your existing network, look for industry-specific LinkedIn groups.  “Familiarize yourself [with the topics] first by reading some of the articles and discussions,” Aldridge said.  Look for recurring questions or problems. The more discussion around a topic, the more likely it is to signal a potential business idea.

Business people you don’t know … yet

If you’re really serious about finding the next great business idea, reach out to individuals beyond your own business network.

“Many innovators, especially young tech startups, are surprised to learn how easy it is to open doors and have conversations in industry,” Aldridge said. “There are very few successful business people who won’t take a meeting when someone asks, ‘Can you spare 30 minutes to help me understand what works well, and what doesn’t, in your industry today?'”

Aldridge said that as your idea develops, feedback from these people helps you determine whether it’s good or not, because you are attempting to solve their real-world problems.

“And if you can solve real-world problems for successful business people, then you have a great business idea,” Aldridge said.

An often-overlooked source of new business connections that could lead to good business ideas is your own local community. Take a look at people who are often quoted in your local media, including business award winners. “I find it most useful to contact them about three weeks afterwards, when the immediate congratulations have quieted down,” Aldridge said.

Outside of work

Getting frustrated because you just can’t find that great business idea? Stop looking for it.

“One cannot find a great business idea, a great business idea finds you,” said Greg Isenberg, a 25-year-old award-winning serial entrepreneur, founder of Wall Street Survivor and CEO of mobile video app 5by.com. He suggested finding a quiet spot outside to get your creative ideas flowing.

How to Building a Relationship

What do we mean by relationship-building?

When we talk about the competency of relationship-building in the world of business, we are referring to building strong relationships with partners and clients – about using interpersonal skills to network in an effective way.

What does a competent relationship-builder do?

Somebody who is competent at relationship-building focuses on understanding the needs of the client and getting the best possible results. This competency promotes an ethic of client service and so an understanding and anticipation of a client’s changing needs is essential. Stress and conflict are other issues that a competent relationship-builder will manage – keeping composed and acting as mediator when conflicts arise.

How can I start to develop the competency of relationship-building?

First identify the business plan goals of your department and decide what your role is going to be in helping to achieve those goals. You will need to study the business plan and learn as much as possible about your clients’ activities, interests and needs. This information might be available in their own annual reports or in client surveys conducted by your company. Talking to your clients about how you can best meet their needs is also a sensible first step to take.

Seven steps to becoming an effective relationship-builder:

  1. Draw up a plan of what you need to do in order to give your clients what they want. Discuss your ideas with your line manager and then do what is necessary to implement the plan.
  2. When the plan has been set in motion, schedule regular meetings with your line manager to review the progress that you are making and make any necessary adjustments.
  3. When you are working as part of a team or group within a department or a company it is important to assess your contribution to the group’s work. Think about how your efforts help or hinder progress.
  4. Make a weekly analysis of your commitments. Set yourself a goal for each week so that you follow them through. Make an effort to do what you say you are going to do – and also, to do it by the time that you say it will be done. If you get into the habit of doing this it will become like second nature.
  5. Build up a file of contacts and classify them in a way that is meaningful for your particular work context. Then you will know exactly who to call with any queries or when you need information.
  6. Don’t just wait for feedback to come to you, request it from a variety of sources – from your line manager but also from colleagues, clients and people who you supervise. Listen to what they have to say and act accordingly.
  7. Build informal relationships with the people who are working around you. Make a point of greeting people who you normally don’t speak to. Ask them about their interests and make it a goal to practise small talk with them. Listen to what they say and remember so that you can ask about a particular interest the next time you meet.

Mobile Device Management

Visions of kicking back and working from the beach with a piña colada in one hand and an iPad in the other are no longer just flights of fancy for many workers. Businesses are finding that it really is possible for employees to work remotely on their own devices without losing any productivity.

As a result, many companies are measuring the benefits of employees working remotely against the logistical issues inherent in developing a mobile device management plan.

There are many tangible benefits of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), including:

  • Reduced equipment costs
  • Increased employee satisfaction and efficiency
  • Decreased IT staff burden (since employees maintain their own equipment)
  • Reduced office space square footage (as workers are mostly off-site)

The risk in BYOD is that these devices can potentially expose security vulnerabilities not directly supervised by IT staff or addressed by corporate antivirus solutions. This is where the need for mobile device management comes in.

A new landscape of threats

Tablets and smartphones are arguably less secure than desktop PCs and laptops because they lack pre-installed malware protection. Most computers include at least a trial version of an antivirus suite, but for the newest mobile gadgets, individual users and IT managers are on their own to search for and install mobile endpoint security management.

This vulnerability has not escaped the attention of hackers, who unleash creative new threats like SMS text messaged-based attacks on a daily basis. The old-school virus, while still annoying, does not hold a candle to the damage caused by these new approaches in cybercrime, which include more sophisticated Trojans, keyloggers, phishing attacks and malicious apps than ever before.

Maintaining security while not breaking the bank

Enforcing a ban on these devices is a near impossibility, but there are options for businesses on a tight budget to maintain security:

  1. The first cost-effective step is to immediately establish protocols regarding these devices in the workplace, including guidelines for acceptable use, forbidden applications and how to avoid dangerous activities, such as browsing certain questionable sites while connected to the company’s Wi-Fi.
  2. Next, evaluate your current solutions to see if they can be modified to protect BYOD devices through password enforcement, remote wiping or other protective measures.
  3. If the quantity of devices or sensitivity of data requires a more robust solution, explore whether the use of Mobile Device Management (MDM) software makes sense. MDM provides a centralized platform to manage all BYOD devices and is recommended if IT personnel are spending an inordinate amount of time securing tablets and smartphones – or if the sheer variety of devices and new threats tests their expertise.

Main components of an effective MDM program

If you determine that an MDM service is appropriate, how do you choose one? Use the following as a mini-checklist to cover the major recommended features:

  • Cloud-based, so updates are automatic and painless
  • Remote configuration and monitoring
  • Passwords, blacklists and other security policies enforcement
  • Backup/restore functionality of corporate data
  • Logging/reporting for compliance purposes
  • Remote disconnection or disabling of unauthorized devices and applications
  • Scalable, so new users and increasingly sophisticated devices can be accommodated easily

Many businesses are only just becoming aware of the burgeoning BYOD trend and the necessity of protecting mobile devices. Small- and medium-sized businesses without large IT staff and corresponding big budgets need a solution that protects them as much as the larger companies. Fortunately, the MDM trend is heading towards more affordable and easier-to-manage solutions, which is great news no matter how big or small your company is.

A Review of Bluetooth Attacks and How to Secure

Bluetooth is best known as the wireless technology that powers hands-free earpieces. Depending on your point of view, people who wear them either:

a) Look ridiculous (especially if shining a bright blue LED from their ear);
b) Appear mad (when apparently talking to themselves); or
c) Are sensible, law-abiding, safety-conscious drivers.

Whichever letter you pick, insidious security issues remain around Bluetooth attacks and mobile devices. While most of the problems identified five to 10 years ago have been straightened out by now, some still remain. And there’s also good reason to be cautious about new, undiscovered problems.

Here are a few examples of the mobile security threats in which Bluetooth makes us vulnerable, along with tips to secure your mobile workforce devices.

General software vulnerabilities

Software in Bluetooth devices – especially those using the newer Bluetooth 4.0 specification – will not be perfect. It’s unheard of to find software that has zero security vulnerabilities.

As Finnish security researchers Tommi Mäkilä, Jukka Taimisto and Miia Vuontisjärvi demonstrated in 2011, it’s easy for attackers to discover new, previously unknown vulnerabilities in Bluetooth devices. Potential impacts could include charges for expensive premium-rate or international calls, theft of sensitive data or drive-by malware downloads.

To combat this threat: Switch off your Bluetooth when you’re not using it.

Eavesdropping

Bluetooth – named after the Viking king, Harald Bluetooth Gormsson, thanks to his abilities to make 10th-century European factions communicate – is all about wireless communication. Just like with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth encryption is supposed to stop criminals listening in to your data or phone calls.

In other words, eavesdropping shouldn’t be a problem. However, older Bluetooth devices use versions of the Bluetooth protocol that have more security holes than a tasty slice of Swiss. Even the latest specification (4.0) has a similar problem with its low-energy (LE) variant.

To combat this threat: Ban devices that use Bluetooth 1.x, 2.0 or 4.0-LE.

Denial of service

Malicious attackers can crash your devices, block them from receiving phone calls and drain your battery.

To combat this threat: Again, switch off your Bluetooth when you’re not using it.

Bluetooth range is greater than you think

Bluetooth is designed to be a “personal area network.” That is to say, devices that are more than a few feet away should not be accessible via Bluetooth.

However, you’re not safe if you simply ensure there’s distance between you and a potential attacker; hackers have been known to use directional, high-gain antennae to successfully communicate over much greater distances. For example, security researcher Joshua Wright demonstrated the use of such an antenna to hack a Bluetooth device in a Starbucks from across the street.

To combat this threat: Once again, switch off your Bluetooth!

Bluetooth headsets

Wright has also demonstrated serious flaws in many popular Bluetooth headsets. By exploiting these vulnerabilities, attackers can eavesdrop on your conversations with the people around you, not just your phone calls. Built-in hands-free car kits can also be vulnerable.

The device becomes, in effect, a mobile bugging device, transmitting everything it hears to an attacker.

To combat this threat: Make sure you change the default PIN code to something hard to guess. And yup… switch off the headset.

5 Elements of a Good BYOD Enterprise Program

Employees are increasingly using their own devices as the mobile workforce grows in importance. A Computing Technology Industry Association study found that 84 percent of professionals surveyed use their smartphones for work, but only 22 percent of their companies had a formal mobility policy. The upshot of this mobile shift is that corporate networks will be increasingly vulnerable, unless these devices are reined in with a BYOD enterprise program.

If your company lacks a mobility policy, consider incorporating the following five elements into your BYOD program to save time and money.

1. Include clear, written rules

Eliminating risky end user behavior through clear BYOD policies saves IT expenses right off the bat. Some of the most salient points to cover in writing include:

  • Prohibited devices, such as jailbroken phones
  • Blacklisted applications
  • Procedures for lost or stolen devices, including the possibility of wiping out all data on a device
  • Privacy disclosures, such as what personal information the enterprise has access to on a device

Some of these issues, like whether the company can legally wipe out data on a device they do not own, should be cleared with your human resources and legal departments to minimize the risk of lawsuits.

2. Make sure it’s formally presented

It is not enough to have employees sign off that they have read the policies – formal classroom or online training is recommended to ensure comprehension and compliance – especially for less tech-savvy workers who might not understand that seemingly innocent actions can expose the company to risks.

3. Ensure that it’s scalable and flexible

Make sure your security software can be painlessly installed on new devices. Cloud-based services do this particularly well and are typically available on a per-user subscription model, which saves money by protecting only what is needed at any given time.

Also, consider exceptions to rules, such as allowing peer-to-peer networking programs for certain users who might benefit from these tools. Otherwise, employees may risk bypassing your security protocols in order to use forbidden applications.

4. Secure against the greatest number of threats possible

Risky behavior such as opening email attachments from strangers or visiting dubious sites on BYOD devices should be addressed in the written policies and further safeguarded via antivirus software.

There are other exploits to be aware of, which might not be as obvious, such as fake antivirus scanners that users might innocently install, and social engineering (or phishing) threats. A good endpoint protection program will keep employees up-to-date on these lesser-known attack vectors and continually inform them on how to best protect their devices. This does not require much expense but does involve staying abreast of threats and implementing a solid communication plan.

5. Allow for remote monitoring and control

You have to have a degree of oversight over which BYOD devices are accessing your corporate systems. This is where a third-party mobile device management tool (MDM) can pay valuable dividends. MDM services provide benefits such as malware blocking, policy enforcement, logging, encryption and remote wiping, all from a single, centralized platform.

In summary, leveraging the benefits of BYOD while minimizing potential pitfalls is a tightrope act, but the BYOD trend can’t be ignored. Each business must strive to develop a program to protect its systems and data from breaches, while allowing workers the freedom and convenience they seek.

The Benefits of Outsourcing Your IT

Just a few short years ago, the image of an IT department for small and medium businesses was one of Dilbert-looking technicians noodling around with Cat 5 cable and speaking in a blend of Klingon and Robot. In other words, IT seemed completely remote, complicated and inaccessible to most employees. Additionally, each new hardware and software deployment, including installing malware protection, could take weeks to manually implement across the enterprise, and rarely went smoothly.

One solution – outsourced IT – has found greater acceptance in the past few years as its benefits have become more tangible to even small businesses. It is estimated that globally, 74 percent of companies use some form of outsourced IT solution, up 25 percent from 2009.

Cost savings

Moving IT off-site can save an SMB thousands of dollars per year. As most business decisions are predicated on the bottom line, this is often the main driver in the decision to migrate. Areas of savings include:

Reducing hardware expenses. Servers, storage, cabling, cooling, and datacenter square footage expense can now be on a cloud vendor’s dime, not yours.

No salary or benefits expenses for IT employees.

Potential tax savings by converting capital expenditures (servers), that depreciate slowly over time, to a monthly cost which can potentially be deducted in the current tax year.

The latest software versions – hassle-free

Outsourcing IT means software, including malware protection for endpoints, can be updated automatically by the provider. This obviates the need for a local tech to run around taking workstations offline for upgrades.

Furthermore, updating software not only unlocks newer features, but also closes exploits in older versions that might allow hacker penetration. So it’sworth exploring any platform that can make this process painless and automatic, such as a cloud service.

Focus on your business, not technical issues

Anyone who survived working in Corporate America from the 1980s onwards is familiar with the spectacle and lost productivity that accompanies the proverbial “system going down.”

When outsourcing IT to the cloud, this nightmare occurs less often as data is often distributed redundantly across many servers that are monitored constantly, leading to greater stability and uptime, and less worrying about IT matters.

Improved security

Reputable outsourced IT providers are dead serious about security against malware, zero-day hacks and other intrusions and constantly monitor and update their protection schemes.

For most SMBs, outsourcing will provide a more frequent and secure back-up solution than their existing IT setups. Furthermore, as the data is kept off-site, it is well- protected from a local catastrophe, such as a fire or flooding.

No new employees to manage when scaling up

Scalability is easy with outsourced IT – simply contact the vendor for more storage, memory and processors as needed. There is no longer any need for job postings, interviews, expensive training, personality clashes, worker’s compensation or other common HR issues and liabilities just to get tech personnel to handle the increased operations.

Instead, you can focus your payroll budget on production or sales staff that directly drive revenue.

How to move to the cloud

Prior to outsourcing your IT, draw up a migration plan. Then study the stability and security reputation of outsourcing providers before trusting them with your mission-critical data. Malware protection is increasingly important, so discuss solutions with each candidate to explore what steps they take in the event of a breach.

How To Save Time And Reduce Your Investment

Trojans, worms and spyware sound like elements straight from a summer blockbuster, but the kind of action/adventure they provide on your PCs, Macs, smartphones and tablets make them more like a horror movie.

By deploying effective endpoint security, you can help prevent attacks and keep your users safe from viruses and other malware, such as spear phishing and advanced persistent threats. Today’s  state-of-the-art endpoint securityhas come a long way from its early roots in “antivirus” and has morphed into a complex suite of sophisticated protections against modern threats.

Keeping users safe

In an ideal world, users would be perfectly security conscious. These mythical users wouldn’t:

  • Click on suspicious links.
  • Open file attachments emailed by criminals pretending to be their friends.
  • Respond to phishing messages that appear to be from a bank.
  • Disable software updates because warnings and reboots are annoying.
  • Disable a security product because it slows down their PC.
  • Install free software from an untrustworthy developer, because their friend liked it on Facebook.

Sadly, our world is less than ideal. Much, much less: A recent report said that 86 percent of U.S. businesses surveyed had lost sensitive data during the previous year.

User awareness training helps, but it isn’t sufficient. That’s why your endpoints need securing. Doing so helps prevent your users from accidentally exposing sensitive business information, such as your  banking credentials, secret-sauce recipes or future product plans.

Save time and money on endpoint security

Your challenge is to protect your users while minimizing costs: How do you save time and money, while keeping your company safe?

Look for a modern endpoint security solution – not one thrown together from an old antivirus program and a fresh coat of paint.

How can you tell?

A start-of-the-art solution does the following:

  • Works intelligently in the background, without bogging down the user’s computer
  • Scans for malware in seconds, not hours
  • Uses a reliable, built-from-the-ground-up cloud security service to identify malware, not a huge signature file that’s quickly out-of-date
  • Works intelligently while offline, reconnecting with the cloud service to check changes made while disconnected
  • Fixes infected PCs, if necessary, by rolling back the computer’s state to a known-good point
  • Automatically monitors untrusted software executions to prevent infection
  • Allows you to enforce certain policy settings, such as use of USB ports, and prevents users from disabling security features
  • Doesn’t fight with competing installed products, to allow you to test it safely

How does it reduce your investment?

A modern solution will reduce costs by being integrable, controllable and reliable. That means your operating costs are lower, and you won’t lose money from malware infections that only waste IT workers’ time and squander end-user productivity.

Purchase cost is, of course, a factor. However, in most analyses of total cost of ownership (TCO), operations and end-user productivity losses dwarf all other costs.

You have to first consider your budget realities, but it’s smart to benchmark yourself against what similar companies spend. There are free security solutions, but they don’t provide the control or sophistication to minimize your TCO.

Don’t Be Fooled

Keeping your company safe requires more than a warmed-over, 10-year-old anti-virus product. You need a state-of-the-art endpoint protection solution to safeguard your organization, in addition to user awareness, enforced policies and proper patch management.

7 Inexpensive Gifts Your Employees Will Love

Travel charging kit

For employees who are always on the go, this travel charging kit is a thoughtful and practical gift. With this kit, you can charge three devices via USB ports using one outlet or an auto cigarette lighter, and all of the parts are easily organized in the included travel pouch.

Desktop storage shelf

Give employees the gift of organization with this handy bamboo desktop storage shelf. It features six different compartments for various office supplies and is designed to fit over a computer keyboard to maximize desk space.

Phone dock and cord wrap

Anyone who keeps a spare phone charger at the office knows how easy it is to lose it among all the other clutter stashed away in a desk drawer. With a MonkeyOh cord wrap and smartphone dock, your employees’ charging cables will be easily accessible and ready to use — and their workstations will look a little neater, too.

City map coasters

Do you and your employees love the city you work in? Show some pride for your company’s home base with these wooden map coasters. Packaged in a set of four, each coaster features a hand-designed section of your city’s map. They’re currently available for Baltimore, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Los Angeles, Manhattan, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Diego and San Francisco.

Sport performance headphones

The other item every fitness lover needs is a solid pair of headphones. Gel caps ensure that sweat and movement won’t knock these earbuds out of place during high-intensity workouts. Even if your staff members aren’t hitting the gym every day, they’re sure to appreciate the high-quality sound.

Bluetooth tracking tag

Have your employees ever been late to work because they misplaced their keys at home? Make that excuse a thing of the past with a Bluetooth tracking tag. When you sync the keychain with your mobile device, you can quickly locate the tag through a downloadable app. An “alert” button on the tag makes it work both ways in case you have your keys but lost your phone.

Clock photo frame

When your staff is counting down the minutes at the end of the workday, this gift lets them watch the clock while reminding them who they’ll see when they get home. This battery-powered atomic clock displays the time, date, day, temperature and your employee’s favorite 2 1/4″ by 2 1/4″ photo.